Saving Money as an Educator

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Teachers give generously of their time, and more than often, their money. With school budget cuts and limited funds, teachers have to find ways to save money and be resourceful.   Here are some great ways to get the most bang for your buck and provide your students with an optimal learning environment.

 

Books

Looking to expand your classroom library? Thrift stores, garage sales, public library bookstores (Friends of the Library) and used books stores are treasure troves of good deals to help develop a love of literacy in your students.

 

Science Labs

Need to purchase equipment for science labs and experiments? An article on TeachHub gives you tips on where to shop, how to minimize and simplify your supply list, and who to ask for donations! Flex your creative muscle as you find ways to pinch the pennies and stock your classroom.

 

Furniture and Supplies

Before you go buy furniture, craft supplies, or anything else for your classroom check Freecycle, Craigslist or Ebay! Or ask your friends and family if they have the item(s) and are willing to donate to your classroom.

 

Graduate Units

Are you in need of more graduate units to move over your district’s pay scale? Making more money every year sounds good, doesn’t it? If you want to save money for your professional development, check out the affordable courses at College Credit Connection! Read the testimonials of teachers like yourself who have found the courses to be a great value and beneficial to their classrooms.

 

More ideas

These lists of the 20 Best Money-Saving Tips for Teachers and Teaching Strategies: How to Save Money have great ideas ranging from applying for grants to getting teacher discounts! They include links and great resources for the frugal educator.

 

Do you have a great money-saving idea to share? Are you inspired by one of these ideas? Let us know in the comments below!

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Back to School!

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Back-to-School Stress

Parents, children, and teachers tend to feel a lot of emotions and stressors when summer is coming to an end, and school is about to begin.

Parents are likely thinking about adjusting their schedules; students are likely thinking about seeing their friends AND having their summer freedom aborted; but teachers are likely stressing the most about getting ready for a new school year.

Psychologist Gail Kinman offers advice on how to reduce stress and prepare for the new school year.   Among other suggestions, she advises becoming in touch with your feelings, listening to your body, doing a bit of planning, and getting extra rest.

Researching advice from psychologists and teachers, five top tips emerged for relieving “back-to-school” stress. They are as follows:

  1. Practice self-care. Get in the habit of taking care of yourself so that when the onslaught happens, you are already in the habit of taking some time for yourself. Remember the flight attendants’ instructions: “Put on your own oxygen mask before assisting the person next to you.” If you don’t take care of yourself, you won’t have the energy to take care of anyone else, particularly a room full of students!
  2. Meditate and/or pray. There are multitudes of studies showing that meditation and prayer lower According to a University of Pennsylvania research study, just 30 minutes of daily meditation improves the ability to prioritize and manage tasks and goals, re-focus attention and stay alert to the environment. Even 5 minutes helps. Close your eyes for 5 minutes and breathe deeply to get back on track.
  3. Be prepared. Just a little bit of preparation can reduce your stress before it even starts to build up. Spend a little time organizing yourself before school starts and you will likely feel more relaxed. Make a list of what you want to do, then prioritize the items on your list. Don’t try to do everything at once. Feel free to cross off a few things on your list. Accomplishing the top few items can relieve a lot of anxiety.
  4. Use your mind. Take a few minutes to visualize yourself making a positive impact on your students. It is amazing how much this little practice can change your mindset and reduce stress.
  5. Get moving! Studies show that exercise reduces stress and releases endorphins. When you think you are too busy to exercise, it is often the times you need it most. It doesn’t have to be a full workout – just a quick walk or some stretches will do the trick. Yoga is also highly recommended.

(Reduce Back-to-School Anxiety Naturally)

Additional links are as follows: Back to School Tips, Back to School Preparation.

Summer and school breaks are great times to work on professional development classes. Flexible, online classes can be helpful for busy teachers.

So, take some deep breaths, and welcome the start of the school year!

If you have some good tips for reducing back-to-school anxiety, please comment below.